ethnographic plague configuring disease on the chinese russian frontier

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Ethnographic Plague

Author : Christos Lynteris
ISBN : 1137596848
Genre : History
File Size : 55. 27 MB
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Challenging the concept that since the discovery of the plague bacillus in 1894 the study of the disease was dominated by bacteriology, Ethnographic Plague argues for the role of ethnography as a vital contributor to the configuration of plague at the turn of the nineteenth century. With a focus on research on the Chinese-Russian frontier, where a series of pneumonic plague epidemics shook the Chinese, Russian and Japanese Empires, this book examines how native Mongols and Buryats came to be understood as holding a traditional knowledge of the disease. Exploring the forging and consequences of this alluring theory, this book seeks to understand medical fascination with culture, so as to underline the limitations of the employment of the latter as an explanatory category in the context of infectious disease epidemics, such as the recent SARS and Ebola outbreaks.

Frontier Encounters

Author : Franck Billé
ISBN : 1906924880
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 36. 47 MB
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China and Russia are rising economic and political powers that share thousands of miles of border. Despite their proximity, their interactions with each other - and with their third neighbour Mongolia - are rarely discussed. Although the three countries share a boundary, their traditions, languages and worldviews are remarkably different. Frontier Encounters presents a wide range of views on how the borders between these unique countries are enacted, produced, and crossed. It sheds light on global uncertainties: China's search for energy resources and the employment of its huge population, Russia's fear of Chinese migration, and the precarious independence of Mongolia as its neighbours negotiate to extract its plentiful resources. Bringing together anthropologists, sociologists and economists, this timely collection of essays offers new perspectives on an area that is currently of enormous economic, strategic and geo-political relevance.

Planet Of Slums

Author : Mike Davis
ISBN : 1844670228
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 47. 75 MB
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An exploration of modern-world urbanization cites a concerning rise in slum life that currently accounts for nearly one-fifth of the world's population, arguing that urban populations are disconnected and exempt from the formal world economy and may represent an explosive convergence of ethnic, religious, and political unrest.

On Their Own Terms

Author : Benjamin A. ELMAN
ISBN : 0674016858
Genre : History
File Size : 48. 87 MB
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Since the middle of the nineteenth century, imperial reformers, early Republicans, Guomindang party cadres, and Chinese Communists have all prioritized science and technology. In this book, Elman gives a nuanced account of the ways in which native Chinese science evolved over four centuries, under the influence of both Jesuit and Protestant missionaries. In the end, he argues, the Chinese produced modern science on their own terms.

The Interpretation Of Cultures

Author : Clifford Geertz
ISBN : 0465097197
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 64. 78 MB
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In this compilation of essays written over a fifteen-year period, the distinguished anthropologist explains his view of culture and its symbolic dimensions

Pathologies Of Power

Author : Paul Farmer
ISBN : 0520931475
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 54. 99 MB
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Pathologies of Power uses harrowing stories of life—and death—in extreme situations to interrogate our understanding of human rights. Paul Farmer, a physician and anthropologist with twenty years of experience working in Haiti, Peru, and Russia, argues that promoting the social and economic rights of the world’s poor is the most important human rights struggle of our times. With passionate eyewitness accounts from the prisons of Russia and the beleaguered villages of Haiti and Chiapas, this book links the lived experiences of individual victims to a broader analysis of structural violence. Farmer challenges conventional thinking within human rights circles and exposes the relationships between political and economic injustice, on one hand, and the suffering and illness of the powerless, on the other. Farmer shows that the same social forces that give rise to epidemic diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis also sculpt risk for human rights violations. He illustrates the ways that racism and gender inequality in the United States are embodied as disease and death. Yet this book is far from a hopeless inventory of abuse. Farmer’s disturbing examples are linked to a guarded optimism that new medical and social technologies will develop in tandem with a more informed sense of social justice. Otherwise, he concludes, we will be guilty of managing social inequality rather than addressing structural violence. Farmer’s urgent plea to think about human rights in the context of global public health and to consider critical issues of quality and access for the world’s poor should be of fundamental concern to a world characterized by the bizarre proximity of surfeit and suffering.

Imperial Russia

Author : Jane Burbank
ISBN : 0253212413
Genre : History
File Size : 88. 8 MB
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Presenting the results of new research and fresh approaches, the historians whose work is highlighted here seek to extend new thinking about the way imperial Russian history is studied and taught. Populating their essays are a varied lot of ordinary Russians of the 18th and 19th centuries: a luxury-loving merchant and his extended family, reform-minded clerics, peasant resettlers, soldiers on the frontier, amateur ethnographers, lesser nobles of the provinces and the capitals, founders of the Russian Geographic Society. In contrast to much of traditional historical writing on Imperial Russia, which focused heavily on the causes of its demise, the contributors to this volume investigate the people and institutions that kept imperial Russia functioning over a long period of time. Eschewing grand historical narratives for mini-stories of politics, culture, institutions, or family life, the essays open new directions for scholars and students seeking a better understanding of RussiaÕs fascinating past. Indiana-Michigan Series in Russian and East European Studies

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